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21012 Hilliard Boulevard
Rocky River, Ohio 44116
USA

(440) 331-0600

Official website of the City of Rocky River, Ohio, providing community profile, information on local government, safety forces and education.

Arborist’s Corner

Welcome to the Arborist’s Corner!  This is the new home of information regarding the urban forest within the City of Rocky River.  We will post updates on the efforts of our City Forester, interesting tidbits regarding trees, and spotlight new species that you may incorporate in your home landscape.  Be sure to check back often for updates!

Arborist’s Corner

 

Welcome to the Arborist’s Corner!  This is the home of information regarding the urban forest within the City of Rocky River.  We will post updates on the efforts of our City Forester, interesting tidbits regarding trees, and spotlight new species that you may incorporate in your home landscape.  Be sure to check back often for updates!

 

Volunteers Help with Ash Trees at Linden Park  

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In August, the Service Department and the Recreation Department were assisted with removals of Ash trees at Linden Park by a group of volunteers from the First Baptist Church of Mount Vernon, Kentucky.  With the help of this group, we were able to remove eight Ash trees and trim other trees around the playground at Linden Park.  We plan on replacing many of those trees with a variety of trees this next spring.  

 

Mulch Volcanoes

 

While travelling through town, I have noticed many instances where trees have been mulched incorrectly to become “volcanoes.”  A common misconception is that more mulch is better when it comes to trees, but deep mulch piled up against the main leader creates problems in itself.  Over-mulching often leads to stem girdling roots and other issues. As you can see in the photo below, proper mulching involves using a 2-3inch layer of much around the tree that leaves the root flare exposed. 

 

                     

Tree Guards for Young Trees

 

As part of our initiative to protect young trees in the city, we will be removing the watering bags from young tree lawn trees during the month of October and exchanging them with mesh guards to preserve the delicate trees from deer damage.  As many of you are aware, deer have been the cause of much damage to young trees in the past, but this new protocol the trees seems to be helping preserve our investment within the urban forest for the future.  This measure is highly recommended in the private landscape as well on trees up to six inches in diameter.

Tree Lawn Tree Trimming

  

As part of our urban forestry program, this winter we will be beginning our new maintenance routine for tree  lawn tree trimming.  The goal of the program is to have a section of each ward have trimming and other maintenance performed on the street trees so that within an 8 year period, all street trees in the city will be addressed.  Annual removals and trimming of hazardous trees and other issues will still be addressed as they arise.

 

Private Trees in the Right-of-Way

 

We could use your help in protecting the safety of our residents and private property within the city.  If you are a property owner with a tree in your front yard that has limbs hanging low over the sidewalk or out into the street, please keep those limbs trimmed.  The recommended clearance over the sidewalk is 8 feet and the clearance over the street is 14 feet.  In addition to protecting our residents and their property, this also reduces the likelihood that the tree will suffer broken limbs from passing vehicles.  With the combined effort of our trimming of tree lawn trees and your help with private trees, we can develop a safe and appealing right-of-way.

 

Tree Spotlight

 

Football season is upon us and what better tree to spotlight than the Ohio Buckeye!  There are quite a few Buckeye trees along Wooster Parkway, south of Detroit Avenue.

 

Ohio Buckeye

Aesculus glabra                         

 

Zone: 4-7
Growth Rate: Medium

Mature Spread: 30'
Mature Height: 60'

Shape: Rounded

Sunlight: Full sun / Part shade; Full shade when mature
Soil Type: Moist, well-drained; variable pH; rich and deep

 

Aesculus glabra, the state tree of Ohio, is found primarily as an understory tree in the western half of Ohio, where the soils are more alkaline in pH. However, it is scattered throughout the eastern half of the state, except in extreme northeastern and extreme southeastern Ohio. Its lightweight wood is used in the production of artificial limbs, and the holding of a "buckeye nut" in one's pocket is considered good luck. A native of the Midwestern and Great Plains states, trees found in the open may reach 60 feet tall by 30 feet wide, but as a native understory it is often half that size. As a member of the Horsechestnut Family, it is related to other Horsechestnuts and Buckeyes, including man-made hybrids between the species.

 

Fun Fact

As a result of a political remark made by an opposition newspaper, a log cabin decorated with raccoon skins and a string of buckeyes became the symbol of General William Henry Harrison’s presidential campaign.

The following became his campaign song:

“Oh where, tell me where was your buckeye cabin made?
Twas built among the merry boys who wield the plough and spade,
Where the log cabins stand, in the bonnie buckeye shade.

Oh what, tell me what is to be your cabin’s fate?
We’ll wheel it to the capital and place it there elate,
for a token and a sign of the bonnie Buckeye state.”

As a result, citizens of Ohio became known as “Buckeyes.” The buckeye tree was officially adopted as the state tree on October 2, 1953. 

Source: http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/ohiobuckeye

Source: http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/ohiobuckeye