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21012 Hilliard Boulevard
Rocky River, Ohio 44116
USA

(440) 331-0600

Official website of the City of Rocky River, Ohio, providing community profile, information on local government, safety forces and education.

Arborist’s Corner

Welcome to the Arborist’s Corner!  This is the new home of information regarding the urban forest within the City of Rocky River.  We will post updates on the efforts of our City Forester, interesting tidbits regarding trees, and spotlight new species that you may incorporate in your home landscape.  Be sure to check back often for updates!

Arborist’s Corner

 

Welcome to the Arborist’s Corner!  This is the new home of information regarding the urban forest within the City of Rocky River.  We will post updates on the efforts of our City Forester, interesting tidbits regarding trees, and spotlight new species that you may incorporate in your home landscape.  Be sure to check back often for updates!

 

Arbor Day is April 29th! Get out and see some of the wonderful trees in Rocky River!

 

Tree City USA 

       The City of Rocky River is pleased to announce that we are being recognized again as a Tree City for our urban forestry efforts in 2015.  Tree City USA recognizes communities that maintain standards established by the Arbor Day Foundation and the National Association of State Foresters.  To qualify for recognition, a community must have a dedicated forestry/parks department, tree care ordinance, community forestry program with budget, and an Arbor Day observance and proclamation.  Rocky River has been recognized as a Tree City USA community for over 30 years.

                       

 

 

 

In addition to the Tree City USA recognition, we have applied for a Tree City USA Growth Award for the incorporation of our tree guard program to protect young tree lawn trees from damage by deer.  Awards will be given at the annual Tree City USA award ceremony in Westlake on May 10th.

 

 

 

 

Since 2005 the City of Rocky River has planted 1,091 tree lawn trees. The City orders trees in the winter for an early spring tree planting. If you are interested in having a tree lawn tree planted please contact the City at 440-331-0600.

 

 

 

New Master Planting Plan          

 

New Carpinus caroliniana (American hornbeam) planted on Rivergate.

New Carpinus caroliniana (American hornbeam)

planted on Rivergate.

If you noticed our staff out checking tree lawn trees over the past month, they were in the process of conducting a full inventory of our street trees within the city.  It has been ten years since an inventory was conducted and our Forester and his team are in the process of developing a comprehensive master planting plan for trees within Rocky River, beginning with the tree lawn trees.  Each street is surveyed to inventory the current trees on the tree lawn and assess the sites on which trees are planted.  Streets are divided by blocks.  Each block is then paired with a particular species of tree that is most suitable based on a series of criteria, including soil composition, compaction, tree lawn width, and the presence of overhead lines.  The goal of this plan is to develop a sustainable urban forest that has the “right tree in the right spot.”  Once in place, the new plan will phase in the new trees and should limit issues such as sidewalk elevation and canopy trimming under utility lines while maximizing diversity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tree Spotlight

 

Our “Spotlight Tree” can be seen behind the Rocky River Senior Center as our 2016 Arbor Day Tree!

 

Seven-Son Flower                                                     

Heptacodium miconioides                          

 

Heptacodium miconioides is a large, fountain-shaped, multi-stemmed, deciduous shrub that typically grows 15-20' at maturity with a 10' spread. May also be trained as a single-trunk tree. Features terminal clusters of fragrant, creamy-white flowers in late summer to early fall. Flowers appear in whorls within each branched cluster, with each whorl containing 7 tiny flowers (hence the common name of seven-son flower). Flowers are followed in fall by an equally showy (if not showier) display: small, purplish-red fruits (1/2-inch-long drupes) crowned by five very showy, sepal-like rose calyces which elongate after bloom and last into late fall. Tan bark exfoliates to reveal attractive brown inner bark, which provides good winter interest. Leaves are narrow, shiny, ovate-oblong and medium-green. This plant, native to China, is rare and may no longer exist in the wild. However, it has somewhat recently become available in commerce and is increasing in popularity as an ornamental shrub, though it may be difficult to find. It is a good source of nectar for butterflies in the fall.

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Source: http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/